Purpose

According to available literature in this field, a situational approach facilitates leadership to be analyzed and studied as practical achievement as opposed to commencing with conceptualization of leadership as what an appointed leader should carry out. The approach appears to be well-suited to self-managing teams, whereby leadership is shared. In the research, I will focus on how members of a self-managing team put in place leadership in their regular team meetings. More specifically, the research will consider how team members impact the move of the team and the associations as well as identities of individual members and the team as a whole.

Background

The research will be carried out in a team within the Roadworks Division of Hamilton City Council. The division has 12 self-managed teams, each of which is accountable for maintenance of roads in a single geographical region. The team includes four men and a woman. Before starting their daily work, they begin with a 15-45 minute meeting about an agreed upon area. In most cases, they gather around the back of the truck for their meeting.

Scope

For the purpose of this research, I will involve in a correspondent-observation for a period of six weeks taking about four hours weekly. I will essentially observe their meetings in the morning and take another extra hour to observe the rest of their activities. I comparison for the rest of the day's activities will be paramount for completion of the research. Team members will be interviewed formally to avoid structured interviews as required for clarification and provision of insight into particular conversations.

Theoretical Framework

The actual research into this subject matter will generally rely on interpretive perspective and the situational analysis proposed by Alvesson's (1996). The interpretive approach is meant to interpret the implications and points of view of cultural team members, and the manner in which these implications are intertwined. The implications are for the sales staff and clients at personal and group level. From this, it would be possible to explore the implications of individual staff and customers for an organization. Situational analysis is meant to direct me in choosing one or few particular interactions to examine in details. As a result, suitable means of investigating the subject from this point of view is observation of the conversation as well as interviewing the correspondents.

Topics to investigate

  • Situational analysis of team dynamism
  • The best leadership style to be employed during self-managed teams
  • The interpretive theory implication in self-managed team leadership
  • The contributions of individual members to the larger organization

Method

  • Carry out a literature review on leadership and communication in Self-managed teams
  • Observe the group four hours weekly for a period of six weeks concentrating majorly on dialogues during meetings
  • Interview team members to clarify and offer insight into the conversations. This will follow shortly after conversations of interest. The interviews will rely heavily on open ended questions so that there are minimal incidences of subjectivity.
  • Carry out a situational analysis of the field notes and interview notes guided by relevant theories.
  • I will then write a research report that puts together my understanding of the respective theories and previous research with the results of empirical evidence.

Work Schedule

The following is a guideline for completion of the report:

  • Information Consolidation 12 Hours;
  • Observation Completion 8 Hours;
  • Interviews 4 Hours;
  • Writing Draft 4 Hours;
  • Revising Draft 3 Hours;
  • Editing Draft 3 Hours.
Jan 4, 2018 in Business

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